Friday, July 31, 2015

After Bolognia ,la Soglia in Parma .




Filming complexity is simple but to film simplicity is hard .Simplicity is what is simple  . Being
a filmmaker , I would love to create and to make live What I imagined. Finishing your film either is short or long only required from you trust ,after it is your baby .You have took after it and defend it . go on With it and do what you have to do . Steven Spielberg admires people Who finds tools to work  and finish a filmic production’























Tuesday, July 14, 2015

la-screenwriter finds formulas of screewriting via Proust


16 Ways Proust Can Help Your Screenplays

Posted by:  , 
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by Fiona Wheeler
A century ago, Marcel Proust changed storytelling forever with his epic groundbreaking novel. To celebrate his birthday today, let’s take a look at the lessons we can learn from the father of modern fiction writing.

1. LIVE LIFE

Proust was quite the social butterfly throughout his early life. When he came to write, he had a lot of material.
How can you write profound, unique and compelling stories if you’ve only ever Facebooked and Googled life? Turn the technology off (after you finish reading this), go and experience life.

2. DON’T FEAR FAILURE

Proust was a late bloomer; many great writers are. By the age of twenty-eight, he hadn’t made a cent and had spent four years writing his first, very terrible novel.
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He abandoned the doomed novel and started reading. From his reading he found he had a talent for academia, which led to success as a translator, which improved his standing in Paris society, which got him into ever-more-exclusive parties, which he ended up writing about in his one famous opus. All because he wasn’t afraid to try and fail.
Your first screenplays aren’t going to be great. No one’s are. Keep writing, keep taking risks, and you’ll get where you belong.

3. DISTANCE YOURSELF FROM DETRACTORS

Proust’s mother encouraged his artistic endeavors and acted as buffer between Marcel and his overbearing father.
Truly supportive people are thin on the ground, but you can distance yourself from detractors. They can hate anyone, they don’t need you. And you don’t need them.

4. BE REVOLUTIONARY

Proust wrote in ways that hadn’t been done before, both in his style and content.
Great screenwriters also change the way we see both cinema and the world. The Jazz SingerCitizen KaneThe Matrix broke new ground both in how we tell action and how we define genre. The works of Woody Allen and Charlie Kaufman constantly question and recalibrate the screenwriter’s voice in film.
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What awesome ways do you wish you could alter our understanding and concept of film? Why aren’t you writing the screenplay that embodies those theories? Be the paradigm-shift you want to see in the world.

5. MAKE WRITING A PRIORITY

When he decided to take another kick at writing, Marcel literally retired from life.
Unless you’re very rich, that’s simply not practical, but you can make a number of choices that prioritize your writing above other aspects.

6. SEEK OUT GREAT COLLABORATORS

Why a bed-ridden writer needs a chauffeur is beyond me, but Marcel, his housekeeper and his chauffeur formed a formidable unit. Without their fussing, prods, protection and their unexpected inspirations, Marcel’s work wouldn’t have the richness it does.
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Screenwriting can be lonely. As your career progresses find a loyal agent and manager who aren’t just there for their ten percent, but truly want your long-term success. Seek out producers, directors, and great and interesting actors with whom you can collaborate.

7. FIND THE BEST CREATIVE PROCESS FOR YOU

For Marcel that meant writing in bed, surrounded by trinkets which evoked the greatest joys and memories.
Whatever your unique process, identify and cultivate it. It doesn’t matter what other people think: you’re unique, and your process only has to work for you.

8. REWRITE WELL AND OFTEN

Marcel wrote each day. Do you?

9. TREAT YOURSELF

When he’d accomplished a rather tricky part of text, Marcel would send his chauffeur out to the Ritz to get some ice cream and beer.
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Few of us can afford snacks from iconic restaurants, but a delectable pastry is within reach. If you’re doing it right, writing is hard, emotionally-grueling work. You deserve the occasional treat.

10. HAVE A CLEAR TITLE

Marcel’s epic novel has a million different titles. It’s too confusing. Most people give up before they’ve ever read a word. Don’t let that happen to you.
Make sure your screenplay has a clear, concise title. ChinatownJawsWhen Harry Met Sally, Home Alone. No matter what genre, we need a title we can say and remember.

11. NO BORING BEGINNINGS

Those who do read Swann’s Way (the first volume) often get stuck part way through. We all know Proust is a great author, so we keep at it.
Make your first ten pages gripping. Make them an easy read.

12. SIMPLE PLOT, COMPLEX CHARACTERS

There aren’t a whole lot of plot points in his novel: a guy wishes he could control love. He tries to control his lover, she runs off, he tries to find her, he doesn’t. Gradually he comes to accept he has no control over others. It’s not the plot that keeps you reading those sprawling seven volumes; it’s the complex, flawed, deeply human characters.
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Ask any top studio exec what the recipe is for a truly great film, they won’t even pause before they say, “Simple plot, complex characters.” Make sure your script has them.

13. TIME IS RELATIVE. TALES CAN BE NON-NARRATIVE

Proust’s protagonist stops time to delve back and journey though his own memories. Flashback, fluid time, stream-of-consciousness; these are all techniques we have thanks to him.
Without a complex, internally-alive protagonist, they’re just pretty little tricks. Your screenplay should only ever use flashback or voice over if it’s integral to the emotional journey of your main character.

14. AN AMAZING ENDING

Those who’ve read the last volume, Time Regained, know it to be the most truly rewarding book they’ve ever read. It’s the culmination of an epic journey. The end is like a greatest hits album, it’s also the payoff of all that has come before.
The last ten pages of your script either disappoint your reader, or make them fall in love. Re-write and re-write again your crucial last ten pages.

15. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF WHEN NO ONE ELSE DOES

Initially, publishers didn’t even read Proust’s novel before rejecting it. A former society butterfly writes an epic novel! A century on, it’s Proust we remember, not them.
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Don’t give up. Good things aren’t ever easy, but they are worthwhile.

16. BE UNIQUE AND BE FABULOUS

There’s no doubting Proust was eccentric. A unique voice is a good thing. Find yours.
So, go out in search of your lost fabulous-ness. And have a delicious petite cake today in honor of your budding screenwriting career and Marcel Proust’s birthday.
~

Saturday, April 11, 2015

How Akira Kurosawa Used Geometry to Visually Create Tension




http://nofilmschool.com/2015/01/video-essay-akira-kurosawa-geometry-visually-create-tension
Aesthetics was not only my favorite subject in college, but it proved to be supremely and uniquely helpful to me as not only a teller of visual stories, but as a consumer of visual stories. I feel like I say this constantly, but understanding the language of film and becoming morevisually literate can not only transform the meanings behind key scenes in your films, but deliver them with a bigger, stronger punch. Like they always say, in film, it's better to show than to tell.
Take the section of the scene where Moriyama corners Shirai -- ask yourself, does he really get cornered? Take a look at the frame below:
A lot of words come to mind during this part of the scene: constriction, trapped, claustrophobic, imprisoned, etc. However, it's not like Moriyama has Shirai pinned up against a wall, though it certainly feels like that's what's going on. The approach taken by Kurosawa and his cinematographer Yuzuru Aizawa for this shot creates feelings of oppression and confinement, because the frame is split by the piece of wood in the center of the frame. This creates a "frame within a frame", a popular technique used by many, many cinematographers.
This frame (within a frame) is used to visually (instead of spatially) decrease the amount of room Shirai appears to have while Moriyama approaches him -- giving the illusion that he's being cornered, that he's being trapped, that there's nowhere left for him to go. Now, if you want to understand how effective this technique is, imagine if Moriyama literally cornered Shirai. Sure, we'd understand that Moriyama's onto Shirai, but the subtlety that creates the tension in this scene would be completely lost.
The brilliance of this composition is this: In the physical world, the world in which Moriyama lives, no space is lost -- literally. However, in the emotional world, the world in which Shirai lives, space is dwindling. Moriyama is unaware (though suspicious) of any wrong-doing, while Shirai is fully aware, which is why the composition reflects the world inside his head, because that's where the tension is coming from -- Shirai's fear that he's going to get caught.
Keep an eye out for the longer version of this video essay, because Tony says he's prepping by watching all 30 Kurosawa films. I think we can all agree that we simply cannot wait.    



Friday, April 10, 2015

Directing



  1. Clear Direction
  2. Don't Always Stick to the Script
  3. Study Other Styles to Learn Yours
  4. Take Your Time and Be Efficient
  5. Find a Clear Way to Communicate Your Goal
  6. Friends Can Make Your Life Easier
  7. Viewfinders Are Super Helpful On Set
  8. Spend Your Time Wisely
  9. Avoid Fights On Set
  10. Stay Hydrated
  11. Don't Worry About Gear
  12. Respect and Take Care of Your Team
  13. Actors Need Motivations, Not Just Marks
  14. Respect Your Actor's Process
  15. Get It Done and Move On
One of the main issues I've seen working on sets with amateur directors is one that the video seems to address over and over again: take care of your team. Be the big brother. Be the mama bear. This means making sure they're happy, fed, and getting along. You could be the most creative, groundbreaking, super duper Oscar-worthy director in the history of the universe, but if you don't know how to be a leader and rally your team to work together and be creative and be excited about the work they're doing on-set, it'll show in your film -- and it's not pretty. (I promise.) Tension shows up on-screen, believe it or not, so it's imperative to not only express your creative vision for your project, but to express your respect and appreciation to your cast and crew. (Get lovey dovey -- it's good for you.)