Monday, March 07, 2016

The ten greatest movies of all time according to 358 world-renowned film-makers

The ten greatest movies of all time according to 358 world-renowned film-makers

Every 10 years, the British magazine Sight & Sound conducts a poll of world-renowned filmmakers and critics to find out what films they think are the greatest of all time. The last survey involved more than a thousand participants, among them 358 film directors including Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Francis Ford Coppola and others.
The Bright Side team offers you the list of the top 10 greatest films ever made, according to the Sight & Sound poll.

Tokyo story

Tôkyô monogatari
It’s a sad, touching story by the great Japanese director, Yasujiro Ozu. The film centers on an elderly couple who are going to visit their children they haven’t seen for years. But as it turns out, their children do not really want this; they are too busy with their own lives. This incredibly sad story will definitely make you rethink your values and priorities.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Who are we in this universe? The crew of Discovery One spacecraft has to find out the answer. They are going to explore the nearby regions of the Galaxy to understand why aliens are watching the Earth. This journey will definitely lead the team to many unexpected discoveries. The screenplay, written by the legendary director Stanley Kubrick, was inspired by Arthur C. Clarke’s short story ’’The Sentinel.’’

Citizen Kane

’’Citizen Kane’’ is a film about the American dream, how it can be fulfilled and what results it can really bring. Kane, the main hero, is a man so obsessed with power and money that it almost ruins him. The film was made by Orson Welles, a 25 year-old prodigy, who, among other things, was a lead actor, producer and screenwriter.

Guido, the main hero of the movie, is a film director who is going to make a new film about the survival of humanity after a nuclear disaster. Decorations are set, actors and screenwriters are ready to work. But Guido is stuck in a creative dead end; he doesn’t know what to start with and where to get inspiration from. This gorgeous, surreal work by Italian genius Federico Fellini is a must-see for all creative people.

Taxi Driver

Travis Bickel is a war veteran working as a taxi driver on the night shift. Seeing the slums and dirty side of the city each night, he decides to put an end to this. His dream is to purge the city of all its filth. Directed by Martin Scorsese, this film is truly spectacular, challenging and thought-provoking.

Apocalypse Now

’’Apocalypse Now’’ by Francis Ford Coppola is perhaps the most powerful and terrible war movie ever made. The film strongly reveals the surreal horrors of war; it is much more influential and emotional than any other movie of its kind. Chances are this is one of those films that will change your view of the world and its history.

The Godfather

You won’t likely find a person that hasn’t heard of America’s most notorious family, the Corleone clan. Created by Mario Puzo, these characters have become world famous thanks to Francis Ford Coppola, director of ’’The Godfather.’’ The movie still ranks as the best representative of the crime drama genre and is hailed by many as a ’modern bible.’


Alfred Hitchcock’s ’’Vertigo’’ has long been regarded as a fundamental film for self-examination and understanding the difference between an illusion and reality. This movie is about unrequited love and the ideal of beauty, which the main hero wants to make a reality.

The Seventh Seal

Det sjunde inseglet
It’s the 14th century, and after 10 years away at the Crusades, knight Antonius Block and his squire return to their native Sweden. Block is tired of life, and does not see anything for the sake of which to live. But before he dies, he wants to make sure that God exists.

The Bicycle Thief

Ladri di biciclette
The film depicts the tragedy of a small man in this big world. The main hero gets his much-needed bicycle stolen. He can’t work without it and, together with his son, goes in search of his two-wheeler. It’s amazing how a seemingly insignificant event, presented with such a simple set of tools without any intricate artistic techniques, symbols or metaphors, can evoke such a powerful emotional response.